Ohio State Immunization Exemption

Here I go again. Another child off to college and this time in Ohio.

She had the proper form from the State Health Department for exemption from immunizations that got her all the way through High School.

Now we need to see whats up in the great Buckeye State.

Here is a nice site that lets you know state by state who allows personal belief exemptions vs religious exemptions.

Personal belief exemptions include religious, philosophical and any other unspecified non-medical exemption.

http://www.vaccinesafety.edu/cc-exem.htm

For Higher Education (college) I found this put out by Dept Of Health in Ohio. Click more below to see the whole story.

Please note that Ohio law does not require vaccination of the student, nor does it require the institution to provide or pay for vaccines.  The law requires only disclosure of vaccination status of the student.

To read my post on University of Central Florida exemptions click here. 

When you read the below statement, at first you think that you must immunize or your child is not allowed into school BUT keep reading and you will see the exemption part.
In the State of Ohio, the board of education where the child is enrolled as a student is required to keep the child’s immunization records. This record is available to the child’s parent or guardian if the request for the record is made in writing.

Before Kindergarten
Every child must receive proper immunization before entering Kindergarten. If he or she has not had these basic immunizations or vaccinations, the child has fourteen days to get them. Then his or her parent or guardian must provide written proof that such vaccinations and immunizations have been administered by a department of health-approved administrator.

The following immunization series must be completed up to the required number of doses: hepatitis B, chicken pox, mumps, rubeola, rubella, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus.

If these immunizations are not complied with, your child may be suspended after the fifteenth day of school.

As soon as the child’s parent or guardian is able to provide evidence of complying with the state requirements, the child may be readmitted to school.

There are exceptions:

‘A pupil who has had natural rubeola, mumps, or chicken pox and presents a signed statement from the pupil’s parent, guardian, or physician to that effect, is not required to be immunized against these diseases.
‘A pupil who presents a written statement of the pupil’s parent or guardian in which the parent or guardian declines to have the pupil immunized for reasons of conscience, including religious convictions, is not required to be immunized.
‘A child whose physician certifies in writing that such immunization against any disease is medically contraindicated is not required to be immunized against that disease.’
Source: http://www.nvic.org/Vaccine-Laws/state-vaccine-requirements/ohio.aspx

For instance, the child’s parents may religiously object to any medical treatment at all. Or, the child may be allergic to a substance in the vaccine, such as eggs.

If there is a chicken pox epidemic, any child not immunized for any reason may be restricted from school attendance until the epidemic has passed.

In subsequent years after kindergarten, the school is required to administer all further immunizations and vaccines.

Before Higher Education
Any student attending higher education must be vaccinated against meningococcal meningitis and hepatitis B and must supply the board of the college or university with written evidence that thisvaccination has occurred.

Source: http://www.nvic.org/Vaccine-Laws/state-vaccine-requirements/ohio.aspx

The same goes with this site put out by Dept of Health

Introduction – College Immunizations

This section provides information about recommended vaccinations for college students.  Below you will find links to information about the vaccines and the diseases they protect against.

The Ohio Revised Code (ORC) Section 1713.55 states that beginning with the academic year that commences on or after July 1, 2005, an institution of higher education shall not permit a student to reside in on-campus housing unless the student (or the student’s parent if the student is younger than 18 years of age) discloses whether the student has been vaccinated against meningococcal disease and hepatitis B by submitting a meningitis and hepatitis B vaccination status statement.

ORC Section 3701.133 states that the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) shall make available on its Web site information about meningitis and hepatitis B, the risks associated with the diseases and the availability and effectiveness of the vaccines.  ODH shall also make available, on its Web site, in a format suitable for downloading, a meningitis and hepatitis B vaccination status statement form that complies with the guidelines outlined in ORC Section 3701.133, (B).

On this page you will find a link to each disease and a vaccination status statement that may be downloaded, printed and used if the institution of higher education chooses.  The institution may also develop its own form, but it must comply with ORC Section 3701.133, (B).

Please note that Ohio law does not require vaccination of the student, nor does it require the institution to provide or pay for vaccines.  The law requires only disclosure of vaccination status of the student.

Mothering Magazine wrote an article in 2009 but much info is up to date. There are a few invalid links but still worth your time.
Ohio Laws ans Rules concerning vacines.
(4) A pupil who presents a written statement of the pupil’s parent or guardian in which the parent or guardian declines to have the pupil immunized for reasons of conscience, including religious convictions, is not required to be immunized.


One thought on “Ohio State Immunization Exemption

  1. Thank you so much! I was so worried that they were going to force us to get our daughter the meningitis and hepatitis B vaccines!

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